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Government Inspector Says ‘Yes’ to Broxtowe

August 1, 2014 12:01 AM
By David Watts in Beeston Express 1 August 2014

Sometimes life on the council can be fairly dull and mundane, but not so the last couple of weeks. First we have decided to introduce a new kerbside textile recycling service, so from November the council will take away unwanted clothes for recycling along with other recyclable material. Can I make a plea here though? If you currently donate clothing to charity shops please don't stop doing this, but for other stuff the council will recycle it. This probably won't make any difference to the council's income from recycling but hopefully it will push our recycling rates above 50% of material thrown out.

The other change coming in on the recycling front is that the council is introducing small red lidded bins to collect glass. We have been using heavyweight bags until now but these have some difficulties. Mine have blown away more than once. The new bins will hopefully solve these problems and hopefully make it easier than ever for people to recycle glass.

Following this the council also agreed that from now on people will be able to record council meetings. This is something I have been pushing for over a number of years and I'm delighted that my colleagues have finally agreed that this is the right way to go. I firmly believe that the council should be open in all that we do and I hope that giving people the opportunity to see what we do may help kill off some of the negative myths that surround councils and councillors.

The biggest piece of news though is that the Government inspector has approved the council's core strategy. This seemingly boring piece of news is actually huge. The core strategy covers a wide range of issues including job creation and care of the environment, but the biggest issue is that it governs where new housing is likely to be developed over the next 15 years. This has been hugely controversial as we have had to balance numerous competing claims and local views along with having to comply with the requirements of the government to make sure there are enough homes for everyone to live in. Every authority has to have a core strategy and these have to be approved by the government. Very few that have been looked at have been approved without modification, and despite the massive and frequently totally uninformed criticisms that we faced in preparing the strategy it is extremely heartening for the inspector to say that we got it right. This will now govern how Broxtowe develops over the next few years.