EU we are the 48That's the finding in today's Survation poll*, asking people who voted Leave in the referendum:

Now that the result has been announced, do you regret voting Leave?
Yes: 7%
No: 93%
Sample size (for this question): 454 (unweighted), 467 (weighted)

[Note to self: I must not write Bregret. I must not write Bregret. I must not write Bregret.]

To cloud matters somewhat there's also this from Remain voters:

Now that the result has been announced, do you regret voting Remain?
Yes: 4%
No: 96%
Sample size (for this question): 430 (unweighted), 432 (weighted)

If you assume that the regreters on each side switched their votes, this would put the result as a dead heat, well within any margins of error in the poll.

Following up my speculations about ways in which the referendum result might be trumped by a future vote, there is also this:

If the European Union offers further concessions to the UK regarding its membership, which of the following statements is closest to your opinion?

There should be a second referendum: 41%
There should not be a second referendum: 47%

That 41%, it's worth noting, is by a long way large enough to make Tim Farron's pitch to carry on fighting the European cause successful for the party at a general election.

The overall voting intention poll also puts the Lib Dems on 9%, the party's highest rating from Survation since the general election (usual caveats apply, of course). That a single figure score can be the highest rating of course also shows how much more work the party needs to do yet to recover. But it is also a tentative sign of further progress in that respect, especially when married up to the burst in new members for the Lib Dems.

* Survation's final referendum poll had Remain ahead by 1%, so it was within the margin of error of the actual result.